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Professor Burton B. Yang Ph.D.

Professor Burton B. Yang Ph.D.

Years of Experience: 36 Years

​​​​​​​Dept of Laboratory Medicine & Pathobiology

Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto

Senior Scientist, Sunnybrook Research Institute

Biography

Professor Burton B Yang received his Ph.D from the University of Manitoba in 1992 followed by postdoctoral trainings in Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology and Harvard Medical School. Dr. Yang took a scientist position in Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and was an Assistant Professor at the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology University of Toronto in 1995. He was promoted to Associate Professor in 2001 and Professor in 2007. Professor Yang has received several fellowships and career investigator awards and is currently a Career Investigator for Heart and Stroke, Foundation of Ontario, as well as General Technical Consultant for Guangdong Yuewei Edible Fungi Technology Co., Ltd.

Research Interest

Professor Yang’s research group has been working on the roles of extracellular matrix, especially proteoglycans in mediating cell activities, tumorigenesis, and angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Professor Yang has also developed a system to study the role of microRNA in tumour growth and angiogenesis cell cultures and in transgenic mice.

BurtonYangWuQingPing

Articles

Anti-cancer components of GL cardiovascular protective effect and circular RNA expression
Jan 14, 2021

The anti-cancer components of Ganoderma lucidum possesses cardiovascular protective effect by regulating circular RNA expression

Yi-Zhen Xie1,2,*, Fenghua Yang3,*, Weijiang Tan3, Xiangmin Li1,4, Chunwei Jiao2, Ren Huang3, Burton B. Yang4,5

1 State Key Laboratory of Applied Microbiology Southern China, Guangdong Institute of Microbiology, Guangzhou, China

2 Guangdong Yuewei Edible Fungi Technology Co. Ltd., Guangzhou, China

3 Guangdong Laboratory Animals Monitoring Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Laboratory Animals, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China

4 Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada

5 Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
Received: June 14, 2016 Accepted: August 12, 2016 Published: August 28, 2016

Enclosed below link to Article:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27713910/

INTRODUCTION

Complementary and alternative medicines have attracted increasing attention as disease treatments, adjuvants, and alternative supplements [1-4]. Medicinal mushrooms comprise a large proportion of these alternative products, among which Ganoderma lucidum is the most highly studied [5-8]. Preclinical studies have demonstrated anti-tumorigenic roles in a range of medicinal mushrooms [9-11]. A Cochrane meta- analysis showed that patients who had been administered Ganoderma lucidum alongside chemo/radiotherapy were more likely to respond positively compared to chemo/radiotherapy alone. These trials demonstrated improved immune functions as measured by increased CD3, CD4, and CD8 immune response cells [12]. In vitro, Ganoderma lucidum was also found to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in ovarian, colon, and gastric cancer cell lines [13-15]. Ganoderma lucidum contains beta glucans and other polysaccharides which stimulate innate immunity and activate host dendritic cells [16, 17]. Ganoderma lucidum also produces a group of ganoderic acids, which have molecular structures that are similar to steroids [18, 19].

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In vitro effects of Ganoderma lucidum spore oil on apoptosis in breast cancer cells
Jan 14, 2021

In vitro effects of Ganoderma lucidum spore oil on apoptosis in breast cancer cells—Cell viability assay and FACS analyses data

Chunwei Jiaoa,b, Wang Chena, Xupeng Tana, Huijia Lianga, Jieyi Li a, Hao Yuna, Chunyan Hea, Jiaming Chena, Xiaowei Maa, Yizhen Xiea,b,*, Burton B. Yangc,*

a.Guangdong Yuewei Edible Fungi Technology Co., Ltd., Guangzhou 510663, P. R. China

b.State Key Laboratory of Applied Microbiology Southern China, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Microbial Culture Collection and Application, Guangdong Institute of Microbiology, Guangzhou 510070, P. R. China

c.Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto M4N 3M5, Canada. Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto M5S 1A8, Canada,  Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto M5S 1A8, Canada.

Corresponding author(s)

Yizhen Xie: xyzgdim@sina.com

Burton B. Yang: byang@sri.utoronto.ca

Abstract

The mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (G. lucidum) is a traditional Chinese medicine reported to have a variety of pharmacological properties, including anti-cancer activity[1,2]. G. lucidum spore oil (GLSO) is a lipid substance extracted from sporoderm-broken spore of G. lucidum. Here, Data were provided on the effect of GLSO on apoptosis in breast cancer cells in vitro.

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Process For Preparing Ganoderma Spore Oil
Jan 14, 2021

Abstract

Inventor

Yizheng XieShenzhu LiBurton B. YangChong LiZhi ZhangQingping WuGuanzhou ChenBiao Luo

The present invention relates to a method for preparing Ganoderma spore oil which is in the field of biotechnology. The method includes using Ganoderma spore powder and Ganoderma powder (obtained from grinding fruiting bodies) as raw materials, applying enzymatic Ganoderma sporoderm broken methods, one-step granulation, supercritical CO2 extraction method, as well as centrifugation and refining. The light yellow oleaginous substances obtained posses a variety of physiological functions such as strengthening immunity, protecting the liver and inhibiting tumor cell growth, etc. Ganoderma spore oil prepared with the present technology contains not only spore extracts, but also extracts from Ganoderma fruiting bodies and mycelium by CO2 supercritical extraction, with more types of triterpenoids. The inhibitory effects of Ganoderma spore oil is a onefold higher than spore oil prepared from the physical preparation of the sporoderm-broken spore. Meanwhile, the problem of spore oil spoilage arising from oxidation is solved due to the low peroxide value within Ganoderma spore oil, and thereby the quality of Ganoderma spore oil is greatly improved.

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Effect of GL spore oil in skin wound healing: interactions of skin microbiota & inflammation
Jan 18, 2021

The effect of Ganoderma lucidum spore oil in early skin wound healing: interactions of skin microbiota and inflammation

Chunwei Jiao,1,2,3 Yizhen Xie,2,3 Hao Yun,2 Huijia Liang,2 Chunyan He,2 Aimin Jiang,1 Qingping Wu,corresponding author3 and Burton B. Yangcorresponding author4,5

INTRODUCTION

Skin is the body’s largest and most exposed organ. It is the first line of the body’s immunological defense against various forms of attack from external environment [1]. Following skin injury, an organism needs to rapidly restore itself to avoid dehydration, blood loss and the entrance of harmful microorganisms [2]. Burns damage the skin extensively and have been studied for centuries, with thermal burns from dry sources (fire or flame) or wet sources (scalds) accounting for approximately 80% of all reported burn injuries [3]. Approximately 180,000 deaths annually are caused by burns; the vast majority occur in low- and middle-income countries [4]. Severe burn injury leads to a clear systemic inflammatory response that has been reported in human subjects [5, 6]. However, low public hygiene measures in low- and middle-income countries might lead to secondary bacterial infections. Therefore, antibiotics (ANT) for an anti-inflammatory effect are needed. Unfortunately, increased microbial drug resistance is being caused by widespread ANT use, leading to poor treatment efficacy in burn wound healing. Moreover, scar tissue formation after burn injury can also lead to long-term psychosocial consequences [7]. Therefore, effective and healthy treatments for burn wound healing are necessary for clinical therapy....

 

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GL exerts anti-tumor effects on ovarian cancer cells & enhances their sensitivity to cisplatin
Jan 18, 2021

Ganoderma lucidum exerts anti-tumor effects on ovarian cancer cells and enhances their sensitivity to cisplatin

Sufen Zhao1,2, Gang Ye1 , Guodong Fu1 , Jian-Xin Cheng3 , Burton B. Yang4 and Chun Peng1

1 Department of Biology, York University, Toronto, Canada; 2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University; 3 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, P.R. China; 4 Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Canada

Received December 7, 2010; Accepted January 10, 2011 DOI: 10.3892/ijo.2011.965

Abstract

Ganoderma lucidum is a herbal mushroom known to have many health benefits, including the inhibition of tumor cell growth. However, the effect of Ganoderma lucidum on epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), the most fatal gynecological malignancy, has not yet been reported. In this study, we determined whether Ganoderma lucidum regulates EOC cell activity. Using several cell lines derived from EOC, we found that Ganoderma lucidum strongly decreased cell numbers in a dose-dependent manner. Ganoderma lucidum also inhibited colony formation, cell migration and spheroid formation. In particular, Ganoderma lucidum was effective in inhibiting cell growth in both chemosensitive and chemoresistant cells and the treatment with Ganoderma lucidum significantly enhanced the effect of cisplatin on EOC cells. Furthermore, Ganoderma lucidum induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and also induced apoptosis by activating caspase 3. Finally, Ganoderma lucidum increased p53 but inhibited Akt expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that Ganoderma lucidum exerts multiple anti-tumor effects on ovarian cancer cells and can enhance the sensitivity of EOC cells to cisplatin.

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Ganoderma lucidum inhibits tumour cell proliferation and induces tumour cell death
Jan 18, 2021

Ganoderma lucidum inhibits tumour cell proliferation and induces tumour cell death

Yi-Zhen Xie a,1, Sen-Zhu Li a,1, Albert Yee c, David P. La Pierre c,d, Zhaoqun Deng c, Daniel Y. Lee c,d, Qing-Ping Wu a, Qi Chen a, Chong Li a, Zhi Zhang a, Jun Guo a, Zide Jiang b, Burton B. Yang c,d,∗

a Guangdong Institute of Microbiology, Guangdong Academy of Sciences, 100 Central Xian-Lie Road, Guangzhou, China

b Department of Plant Pathology, South China Agricultural University, 483 Wu-Shan Road, Guangzhou, China

c Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Canada M4N 3M5

d Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., Canada

Received 18 March 2005; received in revised form 8 October 2005; accepted 11 October 2005

Abstract

Ganoderma lucidum, a traditional Chinese medicinal fungus, has been a favourite remedy in oriental medicine for centuries. The objective of this study is to analyze whether G. lucidum affects cancer cell proliferation and cell death. Malignant human breast carcinoma cells were used in our studies. Different preparations of G. lucidum spores were added to the cancer cells at a final concentration of 1 mg/ml followed by incubation of the cultures for two days. Treatment with G. lucidum resulted in tumour cells detachment from the tissue culture plates and death. The proliferation of the adherent cells was also inhibited. The experiments indicated that the inhibitory effects of G. lucidum on cancer cell growth were sporoderm-broken spores (broken by enzymatic method) > sporoderm-broken spores (broken by physical method) > intact spores > buffer control....

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Ergosterol peroxide activates Foxo3-mediated cell death...
Jan 18, 2021

Ergosterol peroxide, within Ganoderma Lucidum oil, is a key bioactive compound that inhibits tumour growth by reducing reducing cancer cell survival and migration. In this study, researchers investigated how, ergosterol peroxide causes cell death among liver cancer cells.

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Anti-cancer drugs for cardioprotection
Jan 19, 2021

Certain cancer therapy agents can cause cardiotoxicity. Recent research reveals that Ganoderma spore oil demonstrates promising anti-cancer and cardioprotective effects.

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